Skip to content

Me, Myself, and I: Writing First Person Fiction

(and publication possibilities you probably never thought of) Writing from the first person POV has advantages. Writers can connect more immediately with an audience, “stay in character” more easily, and thoroughly explore a character with nuance and depth. The Bell Jar and The Handmaids Tale demonstrate the power of this point of view. It is…

Read More

Mastering the Three-Act Story Structure

For thousands of years, the three-act structure has been the predominant method for telling stories. It’s still the basis of plays, books, and movies because it works so well. But how does it work? In this session, we’ll explore the driving elements of story, how to place key elements, where your subplots should begin and…

Read More

Writing Engaging Opening Pages

At the beginning of a novel, an author must hook the reader (whether the reader is an agent, editor, or the final reader). Middle grade author Sylvia Liu will share the key elements that opening lines, scenes, and chapters should include to engage a reader. She will provide craft tips and share examples of successful…

Read More

Writing Romance

Romance is one of the most popular—and most lucrative—literary genres, but it’s also one of the most creative! From edgy romantic suspense to sweet second-chance romance there’s something in the romance genre for everyone, even if they don’t realize it yet. This seminar will introduce participants to the basics of the romance genre, with a…

Read More

Writing Supernatural Horror: Destroying the Ordinary

According to H.P. Lovecraft, a horror tale possesses “a certain atmosphere of breathless and unexplainable dread of outer, unknown forces.” He continues: “There must be a hint […] of that most terrible conception of the human brain–a malign and particular suspension or defeat of those fixed laws of Nature which are our only safeguard against…

Read More

How to Write Disabled Characters

Are you writing a physically, mentally or developmentally disabled character in your story? If so, this class is for you. We will be learning how to represent characters with various disabilities and what each disabled community hopes for in their portrayals. Disabled readers are always looking for characters who acknowledge their disability and have independent,…

Read More

Writing Flash Fiction: Brief, With Feeling

“For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” This six-word story, supposedly written by Ernest Hemingway, is often used to demonstrate how a whole story can be embedded in a small moment—in this case, a classified ad. In our two-meeting workshop, we’ll look at a number of pieces of flash fiction in order to uncover the deeper…

Read More

Writing Flash Fiction: Brief, With Feeling

“For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” This six-word story, supposedly written by Ernest Hemingway, is often used to demonstrate how a whole story can be embedded in a small moment—in this case, a classified ad. In our two-meeting workshop, we’ll look at a number of pieces of flash fiction in order to uncover the deeper…

Read More

Creating a Strong Romantic Arc

Join us and learn how to create a compelling love story that showcases a heartfelt, emotional connection between your main characters. In this course, you’ll learn about the classic beats to every romantic story arc, and you’ll gain insights on how to make the arc unique to your own story. We’ll also discuss internal and…

Read More

Somewhere Cozy: Setting in the Cozy Mystery

Sherlock Holmes said, “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” From cookies to cats, waitresses to witches, murder to misdemeanors, a mystery happens somewhere, and in a cozy mystery, that setting is of the utmost importance, becoming a character all its own. We will take Sherlock’s line as…

Read More